Least We Forget.

In Flanders fields the poppies blow
Between the crosses, row on row,
That mark our place; and in the sky
The larks, still bravely singing, fly
Scarce heard amid the guns below.

We are the Dead. Short days ago
We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
Loved and were loved, and now we lie
In Flanders fields.

Take up our quarrel with the foe:
To you from failing hands we throw
The torch; be yours to hold it high.
If ye break faith with us who die
We shall not sleep, though poppies grow
In Flanders fields.

Two-minute silence marks Armistice Day on 11 November

Millions of people across the UK fell silent for two minutes at 11am on 11 November to remember all those who’ve fought and died for their country.

The annual silence is held every year as part of Armistice Day, the formal name for Remembrance Day.

It starts at 11am as that’s when the western front line fell silent at the end of World War I in 1918.

People remember veterans from the two world wars and later conflicts, such as those in Iraq and Afghanistan.

The second Sunday of November is Remembrance Sunday, but what does it all mean and what are you meant to do?

At 11am men, women and children all across Britain hold a two minute silence to remember the millions who have died in war.

The silence is usually observed at war memorials, cenotaphs, religious services and shopping centres throughout the country.

The Royal Family, along with top politicians and religious leaders, gather at The Cenotaph in Whitehall, London, for a service.

What is Armistice Day?

Armistice Day is on 11 November. It’s also known as Remembrance Day.

A two minute silence is observed at 11am on the 11th day of the 11th month because this is when World War I, or the Great War, ended in 1918.

But now, this anniversary is used to remember all the people who’ve died in wars since World War I.

Soldiers in Afghanistan
Soldiers observing the two minutes silence.

This includes World War II, the Falklands War, the Gulf War, and conflicts in Afghanistan and Iraq.

Why do we hold a two minute silence?

The first two minute silence in Britain was held on 11 November 1919, when King George V asked the public to observe a silence at 11am.

This was one year after the end of World War I.

He made the request so “the thoughts of everyone may be concentrated on reverent remembrance of the glorious dead”.

Poppies are red flowers which are worn to show others that you are remembering those who died for their country.

The reason poppies are used is because they are the flowers which grew on the battlefields after World War I ended.

Poppies are also used to raise money for servicemen and women who are still alive but whose lives have been changed by war.

The charity that runs the Poppy Appeal is called The Royal British Legion.

Each year, volunteers will sell these poppies in the street all over Britain.

You can decide how much money you want to give to the poppy sellers.

London buildings lit up for Remembrance weekend

Remembrance Day happens every year on November 11, it’s the time when we can look back and remember all those who have fought and died at war. This year buildings all round London are being lit up as a sign of remembrance.

Fifa has agreed that the England, Scotland and Wales teams can wear poppies on their black armbands during Saturday’s friendly against Spain at Wembley.

The move came after Prince William and Prime Minister David Cameron wrote to Fifa asking that England be allowed to wear shirts embroidered with poppies.

Fifa had been saying no because it was against their rules.

Wales and England are going ahead with the plan.

Scotland are checking first with their opponents Cyprus.

England will still hold a minute’s silence before their match against Spain on Saturday, which kicks off at 5pm.

Poppies are worn to remember those who died fighting to protect their country.

Lots of people were angry that the players couldn’t have the embroidered poppies on their kit.

Prime Minister David Cameron had called Fifa’s decision “outrageous”.

“Wearing a poppy is an act of huge respect and national pride. I hope Fifa will reconsider,” he said.

Soldiers mark out the figure of 90
It’s 90 years since the first poppy appeal launched

Fifa’s rules normally say players’ shirts cannot have commercial, religious or political messages on them.

The sport’s world governing body said that if England were allowed to wear the poppy, other countries might want to put their own slogans on their shirts.

But the latest agreement from Fifa means that poppies will be seen on the pitch after all.

England and Wales’ rugby league players will also be wearing poppies this weekend, along with the other two teams – Australia and New Zealand – involved in the Four Nations.

Fifa has agreed that the England, Scotland and Wales teams can wear poppies on their black armbands during Saturday’s friendly against Spain at Wembley.

The move came after Prince William and Prime Minister David Cameron wrote to Fifa asking that England be allowed to wear shirts embroidered with poppies.

Fifa had been saying no because it was against their rules.

Wales and England are going ahead with the plan.

Scotland are checking first with their opponents Cyprus.

England will still hold a minute’s silence before their match against Spain on Saturday, which kicks off at 5pm.

Poppies are worn to remember those who died fighting to protect their country.

Lots of people were angry that the players couldn’t have the embroidered poppies on their kit.

Prime Minister David Cameron had called Fifa’s decision “outrageous”.

“Wearing a poppy is an act of huge respect and national pride. I hope Fifa will reconsider,” he said.

It’s 90 years since the first poppy appeal launched

Fifa’s rules normally say players’ shirts cannot have commercial, religious or political messages on them.

The sport’s world governing body said that if England were allowed to wear the poppy, other countries might want to put their own slogans on their shirts.

But the latest agreement from Fifa means that poppies will be seen on the pitch after all.

England and Wales’ rugby league players will also be wearing poppies this weekend, along with the other two teams – Australia and New Zealand – involved in the Four Nations.

Time Line Falklands 

Saturday 1st May

HMS Alacrity – slightly damaged by bomb near misses

HMS Arrow – slightly damaged by cannon fire

HMS Glamorgan – slightly damaged by bomb near misses, all off Stanley by Daggers of FAA Grupo 6.

Tuesday 4th May

HMS SHEFFIELD – mortally damaged south east of Falklands by Exocet missile fired by Super Etendard of CANA 2 Esc. Burnt out and sank in tow on Monday 10th May.

Wednesday 12th May

HMS Glasgow – moderately damaged off Stanley by unexploded bomb (1) dropped by A-4B Skyhawks of FAA Grupo 5. Bomb passed through hull but damage took some days to repair and she shortly returned to UK.

Friday 21st May

HMS Antrim – seriously damaged in Falkland Sound outside San Carlos Water by unexploded bomb (2) dropped by Daggers of FAA Grupo 6. UXB removed but damage took some days to repair.

HMS Broadsword – slightly damaged outside San Carlos Water by cannon fire from Daggers of Grupo 6.

HMS Argonaut – slightly damaged outside San Carlos Water by rockets and cannon fire from Aermacchi MB.339A of CANA 1 Esc, and then seriously damaged by two unexploded bombs (3/4) dropped by A-4B Skyhawks of FAA Grupo 5. Removing the UXB’s and carrying out repairs took a number of days and although declared operational, she soon sailed for the UK.

HMS Brilliant – slightly damaged outside San Carlos Water by cannon fire from Daggers of Grupo 6. (Different attack from “Broadsword”)

HMS ARDENT – badly damaged in Grantham Sound by bombs – hits, UXB’s (5+) and near misses – dropped by Daggers of Grupo 6, then mortally damaged by bombs from A-4Q Skyhawks of CANA 3 Esc off North West Island. Sank the following evening.

Sunday 23rd May

HMS ANTELOPE – damaged in San Carlos Water by two unexploded bombs (6/7) dropped by A-4B Skyhawks of Grupo 5. One of the bombs exploded that evening while being defused and she caught fire and sank next day.

Monday 24th May

RFA Sir Galahad – damaged by unexploded bomb (8) and out of action for some days,

RFA Sir Lancelot – damaged by unexploded bomb (9) and not fully operational for almost three weeks,

RFA Sir Bedivere – slightly damaged by glancing bomb, all in San Carlos Water probably by A-4C Skyhawks of FAA Grupo 4.  

Tuesday 25th May

HMS Broadsword – damaged north of Pebble Island by bomb from A-4B Skyhawk of Grupo 5 bouncing up through her stern and out again to land in the sea.

HMS COVENTRY – sunk north of Pebble Island in same attack by three bombs.

ATLANTIC CONVEYOR – mortally damaged north east of Falklands by Exocet missile fired by Super Etendard of CANA 2 Esc. Burnt out and later sank in tow.

Saturday 29th May

British Wye – hit north of South Georgia by bomb dropped by C-130 Hercules of FAA Grupo 1 which bounced into the sea without exploding

Tuesday 8th June

HMS Plymouth – damaged in Falkland Sound off San Carlos Water by four unexploded bombs (10-13) from Daggers of FAA Grupo 6.

RFA SIR GALAHAD – mortally damaged off Fitzroy by bombs from A-4B Skyhawks of Grupo 5 and burnt out. Later in June towed out to sea and sunk as a war grave.

RFA Sir Tristram – badly damaged off Fitzroy in same attack and abandoned, but later returned to UK and repaired.

LCU F4, HMS Fearless – sunk in Choiseul Sound by bomb from A-4B Skyhawk of Grupo 5.

Saturday 12th June

HMS Glamorgan – damaged off Stanley by land-based Exocet missile.

Roll of Honour logoThe Falklands War Page of Remembrance

Eulogy

The Names of the Fallen

Of the 28,000 British airmen, sailors and soldiers who sailed south in May of 1982, 253 did not return. A total of 255 British men and women were killed during the Falklands War.  Sources state that there were 123 British Army personnel, 88 Royal Navy, 10 Royal Fleet Auxiliary, 9 Merchant Navy, 25 Royal Marines, 1 RAF, and 3 women civilian casualties. The most senior rank killed was Lieutenant Colonel Jones VC who was killed while leading his troops at the Battle of Goose Green.

A total of 777 personnel were wounded during the war of which 581 were evacuated to the hospital ship Uganda, 569 were evacuated to the United Kingdom through Montevideo.  The number of British causalities killed, was less than in the Korean War, Malaya and Northern Ireland until 1982, but more than in Cyprus, Aden and Borneo.  The 3rd Parachute Battalion suffered the most losses for a single unit lost with 23 killed during the Battle of Mount Longdon and two days of shelling.

Most of the dead were returned to Britain after the war had ended.  This was the first time ever that the British Government had returned the remains of service personnel killed over seas.  Until the Falklands War all remains of British servicemen killed overseas remained in whatever far off country they had fallen. 23 bodies did remain in the Falklands and are buried at the ” Blue Beach” Military Cemetery at San Carlos not far from where 3rd Commando Brigade had its headquarters until the breakout.  Many of the bodies of the men who died at sea were never found and the ships on which they served and died on have became their everlasting and official memorial.

EULOGY

The hardy and sometimes boisterous British people of today are the result of constant invasions over thousands of years by the Danes, Vikings, Romans, Germans, Dutch, and French. This is borne out by the fact that even today one can travel round Britain and still hear the different dialects. Being islanders, most people who were invaded knew that they had to stand and fight because there was nowhere to run and escape. To put to sea was to double the peril. Thus the weak were killed and the stronger survivors began to emerge. The stronger also realized that instead of the sea being feared it should be conquered.

>Later, Henry the Eighth proved this point many times, and so it was that his daughter Elizabeth and Sir Francis Drake became the main antagonists of the King of Spain who named him El Drako. (The Dragon) Sir Francis Drake did in fact finish his game of bowls, then set off to rout the Spanish Armada.

In 1215 English nobles forced King John to sign the Magna Carta and since then the English have cherished their right to be free and will fight to retain it.

Anyone seeking to nullify that document has to face the British service man that will update his intelligence. 

No one enters Britain or British territory bearing a sword; a passport is the only valid document.

One of the ingredients in this political pie was national pride; another was understandably the memory of the humiliation of the King of Spain. But Britain also had national pride and no one was to again set foot on British soil with out first asking.

Since Argentina handled the affair with a heavy hand, Britain after a lot of debating, decided it also would be heavy handed, and lit the fuse that was to be the War of the Falklands.

The British service men that went to the Falklands knew what they were going into. Like their fathers before them, well trained and fit, they went over and did it.

T.O.B. 2000

The dead of 2 Para and a Royal Marine pilot (Lieutenant Richard Nunn) are buried after the battle of Goose Green and Darwin
The dead of 2 Para and a Royal Marine pilot (Lieutenant Richard Nunn) are buried after the battle of Goose Green and Darwin 

Blue Beach Military Cemetery at San Carlos “Blue Beach” Military Cemetery at San Carlos

Family's of the fallen returned to the Falklands to pay their final respects
Family’s of the fallen returned to the Falklands to pay their final respects 

The Memorial at Goose Green to the men of 2 Para
The Memorial at Goose Green to the men of 2 Para

They shall grow not old, as we that are left grow old
Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn
At the going down of the sun and in the morning
We will remember them

In Memory of two very dear and close friends I lost in the Falklands Conflict

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